we dig dayton

Archive for October, 2008

Show Highlights Dayton Contemporary Dance Company’s 40th Anniversary

A multimedia art show featuring the dance photography of DaytonCREATE’s own Andy Snow, paintings by artist Terry Hitt, and sculptures by Tess Little are on display at the Link Gallery through November 1st. Featured here is Snow’s “las des,” and content from the Dayton Daily News follows:

From the Dayton Daily News:
Show celebrates dance company’s 40 years
‘Balance Point’ theme of photography, abstract art and sculpted works at Link Gallery.

By Pamela Dillon

Contributing Writer

Sunday, October 26, 2008

A little dancing dress, the beauty of movement in mid-leap and the rhythm of abstract art are combined in a show to celebrate Dayton Contemporary Dance Company’s 40th anniversary at the Link Gallery in the Oregon Arts District.

Amazing photography by Andy Snow, the abstract meanderings of Terry Hitt and sculptured works by Tess Little are choreographed together to enhance the “Balance Point” theme.

“The artists all made such wonderful correlations between the dance form and the visual art form. Dance, sculpture, photographs, any kind of art form, even literature and music — all has to have that point of balance and rhythm flow,” said Kaye Carlile, gallery co-owner.

Snow is presenting 10 images of Dayton Contemporary Dance Company choreography. He captures the joy of dancers caught in mid-leap, in total synchronocity with another dancer, or as an explosive unit. In “Las Des,” a 24-by-36-inch color archival print, two upper torsos appear to be reaching out from one set of legs. For “Leap of Faith,” he records with split-second timing the apex of a jump.

“Awareness of the moment is key,” said Snow, who lists Sol Libsohn, Peter Bunnell and Marcel Saba as his mentors. “It may be the turn of the head, the unnoticed background element, or the sun bursting through at an opportune moment. My goal is to always be ready to see.”

Snow began his love for dance photography when he shot images of Dayton Ballet dancers in their Victoria Theatre studio in 1983. Since then, he’s incorporated images of contemporary dance moves within DCDC.

Hitt actually recognized his need for dance before his love for the paint and brush. But as a child, his preference for dance instruction was tempered “through the many dance concerts” he attended. He is showing eleven abstract paintings, and one sculpted piece, polycarbonate “Dancing Figures.”

For “Naturally Spring Fantastic,” a large-scale oil, he seamlessly incorporates dancing forms in an undulating landscape ground. Hitt also mimics ancient drawings of brightly-hued stick figures that dance across the canvas.

“I may never be an accomplished dancer, but I dance on the page to celebrate life,” Hitt said.

And last, but certainly not least, are the sculpted works of Tess Little. It’s a joy to experience her works up close and personal, everything from her sassy bronze “Little Black Dress” to a vision of her husband and grandson “On Top of the World,” a clay globe with bronze playful figures.

Most everyone has seen her “Healing Circle” of women holding hands in a show of solidarity. A newer work is also mesmerizing. “Swept Away” is a bronze and steel work also created in a circular pattern. High on a pedestal, the focal female figure flies with the wind.

“Dancing and sculpture have much in common. They both move through space in exciting ways, stirring the soul and creating compositions that sing the song of life,” Little said.

How to go

What: Balance Point

Where: Link Gallery, 519 E. Fifth St.

When: Through Nov. 1

Hours: 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 2 to 7:30 p.m. Saturday

Information: (937) 224-7707, (937) 684-3505 or www.linkgallery.org


Lt. Gov. Fisher at Little Art Theatre for film screening

Lieutenant Governor Lee Fisher will be in Yellow Springs for a showing of the documentary film SWING STATE, this Saturday, Oct. 25 at 4 p.m. in the Little Art Theatre. SWING STATE is an intimate look at Lt.Governor candidate Lee Fisher’s family during the statewide campaign leading up
to the 2006 Democratic victories.  The candidate’s son, film director Jason Zone Fisher, interlaces scenes from his father’s 1998 run for Governor with those from the 2006 campaign and includes vignettes of Ted Strickland, Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, John Kerry,Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and many more.
Ticket sales benefit the Greene County Democratic Party. Doors will open
at 3:30 p.m.  Reserved tickets are for sale through the Democratic Party
office in Xenia, 87 East Main Street, phone 372-6003. Minimum donation
$20. Tickets will be available at the door.


Susan Byrnes explains why she chose Dayton

“I chose to move to Dayton a few years ago- above New York City- because I found a different environment here- a place where I could know all of these people around the table, a place where I could meet the Governor. This would not be happening to me in New York City.”

Byrnes continued: “The size of the community, the nature of the arts in the community, and the fact that we have all of these innovative people here who want to talk to each other, who want to be in an intellectually stimulating community that crosses the boundaries between technology, science, and the arts. That is really the power of DaytonCREATE.”


Kate Ervin talks territorial assets with Governor Strickland


Kate Ervin, with the Creative Incubator team, shared with Governer Strickland and Mayor McLin the need to ensure “vital urban areas and strong cultural arts scenes. We need to highlight the territorial assets of our core cities- the quality of life and amenities that a city can offer is what will attract young people to move there and stay. It’s the ballet, and the restaurants, but it’s also the emerging artists and their space needs.”


FilmDayton president asks Governor for incentives

Gloria Skurski, president of Film Dayton, stated “this region has a very strong potential for building a significant film industry,” an industry that can bring very good jobs to recent graduates and unemployed but highly skilled blue collar workers. “The remarkable program at Wright State University, combined with the nucleus of critically acclaimed filmmakers and high-tech post-production technologies creates an environment ripe for collaboration and job creation.” Along with our local talent, “we have historic architecture, small town Americana, four seasons, and a very supportive city government,” Skurski said. “State tax incentives are the missing ingredient.”


DaytonCREATE Convenes with Governor Strickland and Mayor McLin

DAYTON, Ohio (10/16/08)Catalyzing Economic Development via Community Involvement-
Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Dayton Mayor Rhine McClin convened with a group of DaytonCREATE catalysts and volunteers to discuss the economic revitalization of the Dayton-Springfield region. The meeting was held at The Entrepreneurs Center in downtown Dayton.

Change agents from the five teams of the DaytonCREATE initiative gathered to encourage the Governor and the Office of Economic Development to support state-level initiatives that enable economic revitalization and development efforts at the community level.

“This is visionary,” said Mayor Rhine McLin in her opening remarks, speaking of the depth and breadth of the DaytonCREATE initiative. “This is reality,” followed Sean Creighton, Executive Director of SOCHE. “It’s about people, it’s about place, and it’s about becoming such an attractive environment that jobs come to the people and come to the place. This is the hope, that community revitalization and change can happen at this level.”

Film Dayton
Gloria Skurski, president of Film Dayton, stated “this region has a very strong potential for building a significant film industry,” an industry that can bring very good jobs to recent graduates and unemployed but highly skilled blue collar workers. “The remarkable program at Wright State University, combined with the nucleus of critically acclaimed filmmakers and high-tech post-production technologies creates an environment ripe for collaboration and job creation.” Along with our local talent, “we have historic architecture, small town Americana, four seasons, and a very supportive city government,” Skurski said. “State tax incentives are the missing ingredient.”

Updayton
Scott Murphy, of updayton, spoke of the “talent wars,” the increasing need to attract and retain young professionals. Updayton is developing a model to maintain “a constant focus on engaging and retaining our young talent.”

Katy Crosby, co-ordinator for the first updayton Young Creatives Summit to be held in April 2009, stated, “We need elected officials to tell us what you need from us, so that we community leaders can be sure to funnel energies in effective directions.” Crosby added, “Gather together young professional groups across the state and tell them ‘this is what is expected of you as the leadership of your community.”

Creative Incubator
Kate Ervin, with the Creative Incubator team, said, we need to ensure “vital urban areas and strong cultural arts scenes. We need to highlight the territorial assets of our core cities- the quality of life and amenities that a city can offer is what will attract young people to move there and stay. It’s the ballet, and the restaurants, but it’s also the emerging artists and their space needs.” Bing Davis, a practicing artist and arts educator for 46 years added, “someone told me once that the best resource of any community is the creative and fertile minds of it’s citizens. We need to acknowledge and attenuate that.”

Davis emphasized the need to maintain educational funding for the arts: “The things we cut out are the very things we need. The arts should be for every child coming up. If art is done well- with good pedagogy and teaching- then what is happening in the child is creative problem solving, assessment and evaluation- all the skills you need no matter what job you get. And it’s vital- it’s not just for those who would become artists anyways, regardless. Arts is a way of knowing and expressing that must be for every child, and we need to keep that in the educational experience.”

Innovation Collaborative
Sarah Ammar of Innovation Collaborative said, “That I, at 22, can sit across from the governor and talk about how cool my community is- this accessibility really engages people and brings them into the fold.” Bringing divergent thinkers together, people of diverse ages and occupations- is vital to innovation, spurs economic development, and brings about a sense of ownership in community that crosses age and class differences.

This Is Dayton
Dave Seyer of This Is Dayton spoke of the importance of reminding and re-introducing a region to its assets. “We are not just this city in the rustbelt. Charlie Gibson was here last week with the ABC tour, the first 20 seconds was about closed housing and run down buildings – that’s not us! That’s part of us, but that’s not what we are.” Seyer continued, “We’ve got such incredible infrastructure here that we have many great opportunities for people to be part of the community- which sometimes you don’t get in other cities. People come here and feel welcome.”

“The power of this entire initiative is that it brings together not strictly the artists, but the people in the community who have other skills, who are creative in science and technology and other areas,” said Susan Byrnes, also of This Is Dayton. “I chose to move to Dayton a few years ago- above New York City- because I found a different environment here- a place where I could know all of these people around the table, a place where I could meet the Governor. This would not be happening to me in New York City.”

Byrnes continued: “The size of the community, the nature of the arts in the community, and the fact that we have all of these innovative people here who want to talk to each other, who want to be in an intellectually stimulating community that crosses the boundaries between technology, science, and the arts. That is really the power of DaytonCREATE.”

All photographs courtesy Andy Snow. More here.


Discussion: updayton Survey Results

Dear updayton volunteers,

Please join us on Tuesday, October 14th to discuss the results of our survey in which over 500 people in the Dayton region responded. Hopefully, from these results we will have a better idea about what topics would interest our participants as we plan our break out sessions for the summit. We are also hoping to listen to your ideas about the selection of a keynote speaker for the event.

We will have some light appetizers and soda for you as we figure you may be coming right from work.

So, we will see you on Tuesday, October 14th at 6:00 p.m. at the Caryl D. Philips Creativity Center at 116 N. Jefferson Street, between 1st and 2nd streets in downtown Dayton.

Thanks so much for your participation and enthusiasm about the updayton initiative!

Regards,
Marilyn Klaben
Volunteer Coordinator


updayton:Discuss Future Events and Brainstorm New Ideas

Discuss Future Events and Brainstorm New Ideas with the updayton Team at Next Monthly Meeting

Discuss Future Events and Brainstorm New Ideas with the updayton Team

When: Wednesday, October 8th
What: updayton.initiatives monthly meeting
Where: The Incubator (20 N. Jefferson St. Downtown Dayton)
When: 6:00pm – ?

Hope to see you there!

Also:

updayton.org (under development)

Read about our initiative here.

Read all of our past DaytonCREATE posts here.


Whole Brain Summit at DaytaOhio

What Happens When Art and Science Collide

What Happens When Art and Science Collide

Join us at the Whole Brain Summit:
October 9 from 5:30-7:00 pm
at
DaytaOhio
3640 Colonel Glenn Highway
Room 280 Joshi Research Center
(on Wright State University)
Dayton, OH 45435

We will be introducing area artists, engineers and entrepreneurs to each other and to our collaborative mission. We want to stimulate the regional economy by tapping into our talent resources and getting left-brainers and right-brainers together to creatively problem-solve.

This year…we’re challenging the community to Walk on Water!
(and if you think you can…you can sign up at the Summit!)

The evening of the Whole Brain Summit will include networking, refreshments and a demo of DaytaOhio’s visualization tool, “The Cave.” A 3-D environment where you don’t just look at data… you experience it.

Space will be limited, so RSVP by emailing InnovationCollaborative@gmail.com and letting us know
if you are a left-brainer or a right-brainer!

Be sure to tell all your creative left and right brained friends!!!


ScreenPeace Finale- the student films

The second annual ScreenPeace Film Festival will be held Oct 5th – Nov 9th at The Little Art Theatre in Yelow Springs, OH (247 Xenia Ave) and the Neon Movies in Dayton, OH (130 East 5th Street Downtown). Screenings will be held on Sundays at 12:30pm at the Little Art Theatre and 7pm at the Neon Movies. Festival passes are $39. Single tickets are $7.50.

For the list of films being shown, click here