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Creative Incubator

Read all of the Creative Incubator initiative’s posts here.

The Dayton Creative Incubator project was established to respond to the idea that thriving, economically prosperous regions are successful because they attract and retain the largest number of people and businesses involved in the “creative economy,” the fastest growing and highest paid sector of the U.S. economy.

To attract this talent base, a successful region needs three important things: tolerance: a supportive environment for diverse self-expression; technology: accessible mechanisms for people to turn their talent into market or public goods; and territorial assets: quality of place.

On Wednesday night, August 6, the Creative Incubator Initiative hosted the first catalyst social event since the DaytonCreate Project began back in March. The event was held at 20 N. Jefferson Street where the Creative Incubator Initiative has partnered with building owner Downtown Dayton Holdings LLC to provide temporary space for street level arts and music events.

How does a project like opening an arts based community third place improve the economic prosperity of the Dayton Region?

Our committee answered this very important question by explaining the process this way:

According to Richard Florida’s philosophy, street level culture is an important draw to the creative class. Young creatives are flocking to cities like Portland, Oregon and the like because there is a street level culture occurring there that is enormously attractive to them. In fact, many of these young people are going to Portland without definitive job possibilities (remember San Francisco in the 60s?) simply because of this exciting, idealistic, bohemian culture.

As just one link in the chain of things that draws and retains creative talent, this is the primary focus of the Creative Incubator Initiative. Our efforts speak to at least three of the T’s that Florida emphasizes:

  1. Tolerance: If we can create a downtown that is tolerant of artistic, diverse, youth culture, we will be providing the “fun” that creatives demand from their local environment.
  2. Territorial Assets: If we can revive the popularity of enjoying authentic territorial assets (i.e. cool downtown buildings, raw spaces, public squares, old architecture, etc.) we will attract a smarter more sophisticated populace to the downtown area.
  3. Talent: If we can provide a location where tolerance meets cool territorial assets, we will create a “scene” where smart, creative talent hangs out, converges, melds and begins the cycle of creativity that is necessary to retain such talent.

So, how does a space like 20 N. Jefferson begin this process? Well, it draws the attention of the high bohemians first, by giving them a physical space to perform and interact. Through the support of our initiative, we also provide them with a broader audience and stronger logistical support then they would have operating by themselves. For example, DaytonCreate can help ensure that LadyFest is recognized by a broader audience because of our involvement, as will many other events and activities that could go on there.

How does a project like opening an arts based community third place improve the economic prosperity of the Dayton Region?

Our committee answered this very important question by explaining the process this way:

According to Richard Florida’s philosophy, street level culture is an important draw to the creative class. Young creatives are flocking to cities like Portland, Oregon and the like because there is a street level culture occurring there that is enormously attractive to them. In fact, many of these young people are going to Portland without definitive job possibilities (remember San Francisco in the 60s?) simply because of this exciting, idealistic, bohemian culture.

As just one link in the chain of things that draws and retains creative talent, this is the primary focus of the Creative Incubator Initiative. Our efforts speak to at least three of the T’s that Florida emphasizes:

  1. Tolerance: If we can create a downtown that is tolerant of artistic, diverse, youth culture, we will be providing the “fun” that creatives demand from their local environment.
  2. Territorial Assets: If we can revive the popularity of enjoying authentic territorial assets (i.e. cool downtown buildings, raw spaces, public squares, old architecture, etc.) we will attract a smarter more sophisticated populace to the downtown area.
  3. Talent: If we can provide a location where tolerance meets cool territorial assets, we will create a “scene” where smart, creative talent hangs out, converges, melds and begins the cycle of creativity that is necessary to retain such talent.

So, how does a space like 20 N. Jefferson begin this process? Well, it draws the attention of the high bohemians first, by giving them a physical space to perform and interact. Through the support of our initiative, we also provide them with a broader audience and stronger logistical support then they would have operating by themselves. For example, DaytonCreate can help ensure that LadyFest is recognized by a broader audience because of our involvement, as will many other events and activities that could go on there.

Read all of the Creative Incubator initiative’s posts here.

Volunteers are encouraged to contact Kate Ervin or 937.554.8865.